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Wednesday, November 29, 2017

Tuesday, November 28, 2017

The Morse Force: The New York Times foments hate

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"The Morse Force: The New York Times foments hate"


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The Morse Force: The New York Times foments hate

Monday, November 27, 2017

NEWSMAX: In Defense of the National Anthem

In Defense of the National Anthem

Image: In Defense of the National Anthem
A fireworks display concludes a ceremony to commemorate the bicentennial of the writing of The Star-Spangled Banner at Fort McHenry National Historic Park on September 13, 2014, in Baltimore, Maryland. The poem verses were written by Francis Scott Key in the War of 1812, during a British naval bombardment of Fort McHenry from the Chesapeake Bay. (Mark Makela/Getty Images)
By  Monday, 27 Nov 2017 02:57 PMCurrent | Bio | Archive
The California chapter of the NAACP is supporting a congressional resolution to replace the national anthem, "The Star-Spangled Banner," with another national hymn. They contend that the anthem is “one of the most racist, pro-slavery, anti-black songs in the American lexicon.”
Several historians contend that Francis Scott Key, the author, owned slaves and held racist views toward African-Americans. The third stanza in the anthem: "No refuge could save the hireling and slave/ From the terror of flight or the gloom of the grave" appears to call for the death of slaves.
These charges deserve to be taken seriously and analyzed in the context of both the times of Francis Scott Key and the times of today. Francis Scott Key’s record on slavery is nuanced. While he came to own six slaves, as a prominent attorney he represented, pro bono, slaves seeking their freedom. In the 1830’s, Key manumitted seven slaves, hiring and paying Clem Johnson, one of his former slaves to supervise his farm. Key’s obituary noted: “So actively hostile was he to the peculiar institution that he was called 'The N***** Lawyer' .... because he often volunteered to defend the downtrodden sons and daughters of Africa. Mr. Key convinced me that slavery was wrong — radically wrong."
Key also defended slave owners seeking the return of escaped slaves. Key once noted that blacks were “a distinct and inferior race of people, which all experience proves to be the greatest evil that afflicts a community.”
The War of 1812 and the British storming of Fort McHenry in Baltimore took place at a time when slavery was accepted on both sides of the Atlantic. The war took place several decades before British politician and Christian apologist William Wilberforce launched his successful movement to abolish slavery in the British colonies. While the exact meaning of Key’s reference to “hireling and slave” is not known, historians have generally viewed the term hireling to mean the invading British soldiers and slave as a specific reference to escaped black slaves who had joined the British ranks in exchange for the promise of freedom and not all black people.
The assault on "The Star-Spangled Banner" should also be viewed in the context of a wider lens than simply its connection to slavery as important as this is. There are likely other motives behind this assault that deserve an equal examination. Historically, "The Star-Spangled Banner" stands for the assertion of American sovereignty for the young nation against an invasion by the most powerful empire in the world at that time. The success of America was by no means assured as the nation struggled to face an enemy that operated from abroad and internally. The attack on the national anthem thus could be viewed as an assault on American sovereignty that finds echoes in the today’s assault on President Trump’s agenda of putting America first and making America great again.
The national anthem openly and unabashedly celebrates America’s military victory. The assault today echoes a dovish anti-military agenda that seeks to cut back on defense and denigrate veterans. The national anthem is, if nothing else, an expression of American military prowess and might.
Since World War II, the national anthem has been recited at national and at local sporting events as a tribute to the men who fought and died fighting Adolf Hitler and the men and women who have fought and who continue to fight in wars defending American freedom. Thus, even though it could be argued that the national anthem perhaps contains vestiges of racism emanating from before the Civil War, the meaning and the significance of national anthem has evolved beyond this. Indeed, the question of the racist origins of the National Anthem was virtually unknown until very recently.
Thus all Americans should consider supporting the recitation of the national anthem for what it stands for today which is an opportunity for all Americans, from all backgrounds, to come together to honor the nation that, with all its imperfections, remains the best hope on earth.
Chuck Morse is a radio host who broadcasts live Thursday's at 10 a.m. ET at WMFO-Tufts. Chuck hosts the podcast "Chuck Morse Speaks" on iTunes and Stitcher and his books are available on Amazon.com. For more of his reports — Click Here Now.

PODCAST: The Morse Force: The left "reckons" with Bill Clinton


New episode from
Chuck Morse

"The Morse Force: The left "reckons" with Bill Clinton"


Fresh off the press!
Chuck Morse just published a new podcast episode.

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Saturday, November 25, 2017

PODCAST: Save the National Anthem

New episode from
Chuck Morse

"Save the National Anthem"


Fresh off the press!
Chuck Morse just published a new podcast episode.

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Tuesday, November 21, 2017

NEWSMAX: The Story of Thanksgiving Includes Rejection of a 'Communistic Plan'

The Story of Thanksgiving Includes Rejection of a 'Communistic Plan'

Image: The Story of Thanksgiving Includes Rejection of a 'Communistic Plan'
(Shsphotography/Dreamstime)
By Chuck Morse Tuesday, 21 Nov 2017 05:55 PMCurrent | Bio | Archive
Thanksgiving is all about football, family, friends, and coming together to feast on turkey and all the trimmings. The spirit of peace and friendship prevails as it did between the original pilgrims, who celebrated their first harvest in the new world after surviving a devastating winter, and the Native Americans who helped them survive.
Yet the story of Thanksgiving begins with an experiment in communism that almost wiped out the colony at its inception. The original pilgrims were financed in their voyage by a group of investors who imposed a communistic system on them to be observed for seven years, to be followed by an equal distribution of property. They believed that such a system, by which each male pilgrim of age would be defined as an equal unit of labor, would yield them profits from the excess capital.
The main source for this history is the journal of Plymouth Colony Governor William Bradford, published as “Of Plymouth Plantation.” Bradford, who lived through the experiment, thus reported on the “communistic plan” from first-hand knowledge.”
William Bradford wrote:
the failure of that experiment of communal service, which was tried for several years, and by good and honest men, proves the emptiness of the theory of Plato and other ancients, applauded by some of later times – that the taking away of private property, and the possession of it in community, by a commonwealth, would make a state happy and flourishing; as it they were wiser than God.
For in this instance, community of property was found to breed much confusion and discontent; and retard much employment which would have been to the general benefit.
For the young men who were most able and fit for service objected to being forced to spend their time and strength in working for other men’s wives and children, without any recompense.
Interestingly, Bradford was aware of other communistic experiments and their failed history.
The strong man or the resourceful man had no more share of food, clothes, etc., than the weak man who was not able to do a quarter the other could. This was thought injustice.
The aged and graver men, who were ranked and equalized in labor, food, clothes, etc., with the humbler and younger ones, thought it some indignity and disrespect to them.
As for men’s wives who were obliged to do service for other men, such as cooking, washing, their clothes, etc., they considered it a kind of slavery, and many husbands would not brook it.
If all were to share alike, and all were to do alike, then all were on an equality throughout, and one was as good as another; and so, if it did not actually abolish those very relations which God himself has set among men, it did at least greatly diminish the mutual respect that is so important should be preserved amongst them.
Let none argue that this is due to human failing, rather than to this communistic plan of life in itself.
Governor Bradford then records how the colony remedied the problem:
At length after much debate, the Governor, with the advice of the chief among them, allowed each man to plant corn for his own household. … So every family was assigned a parcel of land.
This was very successful. It made all hands very industrious, so that much more corn was planted than otherwise would have been by any means the Governor or any other could devise, and saved him a great deal of trouble, and gave far better satisfaction.
The women now went willing into the field, and took their little ones with them to plant corn, while before they would allege weakness and inability, and to have compelled them would have been thought great tyranny and oppression.
The rejection of the communist system by the pilgrims, which profoundly affected the future course of American society, led to the bountiful harvest and the first Thanksgiving feast.
In 1789, President George Washington declared Thanksgiving a federal holiday: a day of public thanksgiving and prayer, to be observed by acknowledging with grateful hearts the many and signal favors of Almighty God, especially by affording them an opportunity peaceably to establish a form of government for their safety and happiness.
In his first year as president, Washington set aside a day, November 26, to be observed in perpetuity, by which Americans could acknowledge their blessings and "unite in most humbly offering our prayers and supplications to the great Lord and Ruler of Nations, and beseech Him to pardon our national and other transgressions."
Chuck Morse is a radio host who broadcasts live Thursday's at 10 a.m. ET at WMFO-Tufts. Chuck hosts the podcast "Chuck Morse Speaks" on iTunes and Stitcher and his books are available on Amazon.com. For more of his reports — Click Here Now.